Tuesday, 21 February 2012

The Wisdom of Things Found



Dear Listener,

What do you see? What do you hear?If you play close attention to anything, animal, vegetable or mineral, in time it will disclose some secret wisdom to you that you are obligated to share with others. I have become fascinated by the insights that "things" can impart to us and this story continues the journey with "Things Found" that I am also documenting on my blog.

Here is a story about a man who knew all that he knew because of what the sea brought to him, and he had an unusual way of sharing it.

As usual, here is a direct link to the Mp3 for this week's episode. You can also listen using the flash player above or subscribe to the feed or listen on iTunes. You can also pop over to Magnatune to hear the full album from which this week's background music is taken: "Water and Sky" by Kourosh Dini - beautiful!

Please consider leaving some feedback for us about the podcast. We are excited to see (from our stats) that there are a growing number of listeners around the world, over 100 episodes are downloaded every day ... but who are you? We'd love to hear from you.

Enjoy.

Wishing you sweet dreams as always ....

10 comments:

  1. Seymour,

    Listened to this at 4am this morning when I could no get back to sleep. It is really good. Very thought provoking. Very true that if we stop and pay attention God can speak to us through many objects and things we see in nature. I am glad I have finally got around to listening to one of your stories!
    Claire D

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  2. Hi Seyms,

    Having enjoyed many of your stories, I have returned having remembered that someone had told me to listen to this one, but I couldn't remember who it was or why it was this specific one until I listened and the memories came in with the tides! It's beautiful and as always, very profound. I also thought it was about time I commented and thought you'd like to know I've been blogging again too.

    Keep writing and thankyou for the 'old fashioned' links. :-)

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    1. Kat, as always, thank you for listening and letting me know about it. I'm glad you enjoyed this one :-)

      Also glad to hear that you are blogging again! Keep up the good work ;-)

      Sweet dreams,

      Seyms

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  3. Thank you for wonderful stories! Much appreciated!

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    1. Thank you for listening, Vinnes! I'm glad you enjoy them.
      Blessings,
      Seymour

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  4. Thank you for wonderful stories! Much appreciated!

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  5. Thank you for wonderful stories! Much appreciated!

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  6. Thank you Seymour....I read something a couple of days ago that said something like: "If a person has something to say, they should say it, because it is almost certain that there is someone who needs to hear it." Maybe that should be changed now to 'if 'something' has something to say, it should be said.' Great story....I love the simplicity of Elijah's life, but the fact that he creates so much potential to affect the lives of others in such a mysterious and beneficial way.....through such simple things as messages in bottles from listening to what washed-up treasures have to say. Regards, Phil.

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    1. That's beautiful, Phil. I'll let you into a secret: this story was very loosely based on a man I met once who lived by the sea and had filled the simple hut where he lived with things he had found on the beach. I have never forgotten that image.

      In your previous comment on Iron and Wood, there was something that fizzed in my mind when you mentioned roasted peanuts and ordinary days. I now remember what it was ... perhaps you have come across the story, "One Ordinary Day, With Peanuts" by Shirley Jackson? If not, you can read it here:

      http://locustforkhs.blount.k12.al.us/classes/blackwood/documents/OneOrdinaryDaywithPeanuts.pdf

      All the best to you :-)

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  7. Cool - I wondered if there was some truth to the tale. I always imagined there'd be people who gave up on the rat race and set up home on the beach or in a cave by the sea.

    No, I haven't read 'One Ordinary day,' but I will. Thanks for the recommendation.

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